Everyday Tote Bag #PH004

Everyday Tote Bag PH 004

Let’s Sew

Do any stitching or printing you want on your bag. (Picture A)

Overlock across bag facing lower edge. (Picture B) Make sure you have attached your interfacing to facing before overlocking.

Sew facing to bag body, matching nicks. Sew around middle curve only. Use a 6mm or ½” seam. (Picture C) 

Sew facings to both bag bodies.

If you have handstitched your bag, catch the wool to the seam. (Picture D) This will stop the wool coming loose after washing.

Nick around corners so seam sits flat when finished. (Picture E)

Turn seam to the right side of fabric. Seam on inside sits towards facing.

  Edge stitch on facing to hold seam in place. (Picture F). Edge stitching makes the seam sit neat when finished, and the bag will be easier to press.

Press both bag bodies, around curve. (Picture G)

Trim excess fabric back on the side curves. (Picture H)

With right sides together sew a 6mm or ½” seam around outside curve. (Picture H1)

Nick around corners so seam sits flat when finished. (Picture H2)

Turn seam to the right side of fabric. Seam on inside sits towards facing. Edge stitch on facing to hold seam in place. (Picture H3).

Edge stitch just around curve. (Picture H4) I sew till it starts getting hard as you are inside strap.

Bag out strap, (Picture I) Check straps are the same measurement/ width at top.

Press bag body flat. (Picture J) Check straps are even at top.

Fold the bag body in half. With right sides together. Now sew the straps together. 

Matching the edges, use a 1cm or ⅜” seam. (Picture K)

Overlock across strap seam, leaving overlocking tails at each end. (Picture L)

Catch overlock tails back. (Picture L1) 

I always catch my overlocking tail, so they never undo.

 I also pull the overlocking tail very firmly when sewing back, as this pulls the seam back under strap. Which makes it easier to topstitch.

Topstitch strap seam with a 6mm or ½” stitch. (Picture L2) Make sure you’re under seam is hidden from the right side.

You should have your two bag bodies now ready for the side seams. (Picture M). I now press the bag bodies to check everything is sitting correct, before going on.

If you want a tie on your bag. Tie to be cut at 70cm (or 27 ½”). 

Then fold in half, and place fold to edge of hem at nick. Attach tie to hem nick on one side. (Picture N).

Place right sides together ready to sew around bag. (Picture O). See photos below for matching facing.

When sewing bag around, match overlock edge and facing seam. Use a 1cm or ⅜” seam. (Picture O1). Use pins to help if you need.

If you have handstitched your bag, catch the wool to the seam. (Picture O2) This will stop the wool coming loose after washing.

Check your bag is sitting all correct before overlocking. (Picture O3). Are all your nicks matching?

Overlock around bag (Picture P).

Remember to tack back the overlocking tails. (Picture P1).

Now we are going to catch facing back at side seams, (Picture Q).

On the wrong side, fold facing down and stitch along seam line. (Picture Q1). 

(I find it easier to start from the top, but you can do it from the bottom as picture Q2 shows.)

 Hold the fabric firmly at the top seam. Which gives a neat finish when bag is turned to the right side.

Once you have stitched facing down, bag out and check your seam is sitting in line at the top. (Picture Q3).

To square bag at hem. Place side seam on top of hem seam. (Picture R).

Sew across 2.5cm or 1” from end (Picture R1). This makes the bag box at hem.

Sew facing down. (Picture S). Use pins if to hold facing in place.

Press and you’re done, Happy Sewing!!!!

How to roll your bag